Humphrey Scroggin, Revolutionary War Veteran

Humphrey Scroggin, Revolutionary War Veteran

Humphrey Scroggin has been discussed before. His burial place is almost certainly in Carlyle Cemetery but his DAR marker is in Steenbergen. See Who is Buried in Humphrey Scroggin’s Grave?

Humphrey Scroggin was born in 1763 in Culpeper, Virginia. He served in Capt. S. Tarrant’s Company of Colonel Abram Penn’s Regiment. His application for a pension was more detailed as to his service record.

“On this seventeenth day of November, Eighteen hundred and Thirty four, personally appeared before the Circuit Court, in and for the county and state aforesaid, Humphrey Scroggins, a resident of said county and state, age Sixty Eight years, who being first duly sworn, according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions made by the act of Congress, passed June 7th, 1832 – That he was drafted into the service, in the State troops of the State of Virginia, in the year 1781, in the early part of the month of March, and served in the following manner and under the following named officers –

“That he was drafted into the Company commanded by Capt. George Hastern, but does not recollect the names of the Lieut. and Ensign – the Company belonged to Col. Richardson’s Regiment, Lieut. Col. Halcom – Recollects no other field officers – Said Regiment was immediately marched to guilford Court House in North Carolina and joined the Army commanded by Genl. Nathaniel Greene, the day after the Battle at that place, and was placed in Lawson’s Brigade –

“That the Army then marched in pursuit of the British, Down to Deep River, at Ramsay’s Mills – This took them 7 or 8 days by forced march – at Ramsay’s Mills, Lawson’s Brigade were all discharged, with the Exception of Capt. Hastern’s Company, and the Company commanded by Capt. Shaw – Our Company was then marched alone down to the lower part of North Carolina across Cape Fear River – The Company remained at Cape Fear River 2 or 3 weeks – Then marched back by the way of Hillsborough to Henry County, Virginia and were then discharged in the Latter part of May – He received a written discharge for three months service from Capt. Hastern.

“That he was drafted again in the year 1781, in the month of July – in Capt. Hamon Crite’s Company, Lieut. John Torrence – Regiment was Commanded by Col. Halcom – Recollects no other officers – Our Company was marched to Mobbins Hill, at Woodson’s ferry, on James River, where we joined our Regiment, then the army commanded (as he thinks) by the Marquis LaFayette – The Army marched across Pomunky River, and he with four others of his company, were placed in a reconoitering party, Commanded by Col. Matthews and marched to within 8 miles of Williamsburgh and Encamped at a place called Ruff Creek Church, and there remained 4 days – Then Fell back 4 miles and staid there 3 or 4 days – We 5 were then discharge from Col. Matthews for 3 months service – in Sept. as he thinks

“In November 1781 he volunteered in Capt. Peter Hasterns Company – the Company was placed in a Battalion or Regiment Commanded by Major Fearn consisting of 300 men and marched as a guard, having in charge 500 British and 40 tories taken as prisoners at the battle of Cowpens, at Tarletons Defeat – through Spittsylvania, Halifax, across Staunton River at (Chisholm’s?) Ford – a new guard then relieved us commanded by Col. Callaway, and we marched back to Henry County where we were discharged in December or January -Received a written discharge from Capt. Hastern for two months Service –

“In February 1781 (1782?) he volunteered in the Company commanded by Capt. Samuel Torrence, Lieut. Jno. Torrence – in the Regiment Commanded by Col. Matthews – marched to Spittsylvania, then Returned & were discharged – were gone 2 weeks – Received a written discharge from Capt. Torrence for 2 weeks Service.

“That in all, his service was 8 1/2 months – that the said 4 written discharges were all burned together with his papers, in his sons house, which burned down in this County, about four years since – That when he Entered the service at the Several periods above stated, he resided in the county of Henry in the State of Virginia, and removed after the war to South Carolina, from there to Kentucky, from there to Tennessee and from that State, to Sangamon County, in the State of Illinois where he has resided for (last or just?) seven years.”

On October 15, 1784, he bought 351 in District 96 in South Carolina. Shortly thereafter he married Sarah Ann Kirby, a daughter of David Kirby and Elizabeth Tarrant, and a sister to James Turley’s wife Agnes. Were they related to Capt. S. Tarrant? I don’t know.

By 1800 the Scroggin family was in Warren County, Kentucky, according to the reconstructed census. The census was taken from the tax lists so it seems likely he owned land there.

On September 10, 1814, he bought 160 acres in Gallatin County, Illinois. By the 1830 census he was living in Sangamon now Logan County, Illinois. From his pension application it would seem he arrived in the area about 1827.

On March 15, 1835, Humphrey Scroggin’s pension application was denied for having less than six month service.

He died in July of 1845.

 

 

 

 

 

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