Browsed by
Author: GenSleuth

On This Day

On This Day

Using On This Day the other day I learned that three siblings were married on the same day. Very curious.

Carl Henry Lipp married Cora Mae Ryan on October 2, 1907. Cora’s brother Amos Albert Ryan married Anna Amela Hubner on October 2, 1913. Their sister Mary Augusta Ryan married Jasper Andrew Veech on October 2, 1924. These are siblings of my grandmother, all of whom I knew and most of whom I remember fondly.

I have not been able to find any reason why they would choose October 2, no historical significance or anything. Since On This Day shows me births and deaths as well as marriages I see no connection there. It’s a puzzle. Needless to say, there is no one to ask.

I have no connection to the program, etc. etc. I just find it useful. It is connected to GedStar Pro which is free for Android. When checking the website I learned the calendar part is now called GedStar Today. It appears it is only for Android. Apple and Windows users are out of luck.

“Facts” in Histories are Suspect

“Facts” in Histories are Suspect

In working with some early histories I noted some interesting differences. I assume much of it has to do with the politics of the time, who was writing the book, etc. Certainly it is evident in many “histories” who the “preferred” families were. And it was not unusual to pay for an “appropriate” mention.

For whatever reason, the “facts” vary from history to history. This example relates to one of the early settlers. I found equally interesting “facts” in the others.

In one Logan County (Illinois) history we learn that John and Hannah Downing came to Salt Creek with their sons Robert and James. Actually it says they are “said to have settled on Salt Creek.” I’m not sure what that means since there are clear records of residence and land purchase.

The 1886 history says the Downings came “between 1824 and 1827 or ’28.” Land purchases came after settlement. Perhaps these editors went on land purchase dates although I find it doubtful they had access to the records then.

A 1936 history (of Mt. Pulaski) written by Judge Lawrence Stringer (an historian of some note, although not always accurate – and definitely a politician) says: “The first permanent settlement in the Salt creek country, in the vicinity of present Mount Pulaski. was made by Robert Downing. With him, came his wife, Jane Morrow Downing, and his parents, John and Hannah Downing. Also about the same time, came his brother and wife, James and Ruth Downing.” Note that Robert brought his family rather than he came with his parents. I do not know if James and Ruth came with the rest of the family or just “about the same time” but James and Robert Downing were brothers and Jane and Ruth Morrow were sisters.

The Downings are believed to have arrived in 1822 from Ohio but there is no black and white proof of the date. In the 1820 census Robert was recorded in Monroe Township, Madison County, Ohio. Robert Downing voted on August 2, 1824, in Union Precinct, Sangamon County. (Logan was part of Sangamon County at that time.)

In 1822 John was 60 and Robert was 28. John and Robert both bought land, much of which remains in the hands of descendants.

The 1936 history says Robert Downing “was a Black Hawk war veteran.” He was a War of 1812 veteran, having served  from Ohio along with his brothers John and Josiah. In addition to the military records, he was receiving a pension for his service at his death. Note is made in his probate file that the government wouldn’t cash his final check. I have not seen evidence he served in the Black Hawk War and he is not listed as a veteran in the state’s records.

Such histories have to be considered clues and not factual evidence.

The R. D. Clark Letter – Royal

The R. D. Clark Letter – Royal

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Clark Letter

The following are the names of the children and grandchildren of Thomas Royal and his first wife, Hannah Cooper, and also their consorts so far as they are known to me:

1 Elizabeth, born June 16, 1783, m. â€|Canfield
● Hannah, married …Worrell.
● b. Daniel
● c. Mary, married …Robins and settled in California
● d. Vincent, born 1814

Children of Elizabeth and her second husband …McDonald
● John
● Phillip, settled in Princeston, Missouri
● Martha, m…Roe, settled in Urbanna, Ill.
● Thomas

2 James, born October 14, 1785
● Leonard
● Hiram
● Hannah
● Emily
● Joseph
● Martha
● Nancy

3 Mary, born June 8, 1787, m Absalom Meredith
● Thomas – m.1 Priscilla Fields; m.2 Jane Basil
● Amy – m. William B. Lawley
● Davis – m. Mary Newcomer
● William – Minister, U.B. Church to Fort â€|, Kan.
● Sarah – m. James Dillon, to McLean Co. Ill.
● Joseph – m.1 Susan Dillon; m2 Mary Adams

Absalom and Mary were married in Virginia, to Butler Co. O. then to Miami Co. O. then to Sangamon Co. Ill. where Absalom died in 1842. Mary died there in 1844. a, b, c, and d born in Butler Co. O. e, f born in Miami Co. O.
4 Samuel Cooper, born April 11, 1789. He was in the War of 1812. While in the army he became ill and his father brought him home where he died July 30, 1812, the same day that his half-sister, Rebecca, was born.
5 Thomas, born April 7, 1791 and settled near Middletown, Ohio.
● John, born December 25, 1821, in Butler Co. Ohio. He married Jane Withrow who died July 23, 1904.
● Thomas R., m. Rebecca Chinoweth, went to Gueda Springs, Kan. and died there January 1, 1899.
● William of Dayton, Indiana.

There may be others.
6 Sarah, born March 3, 1793, died Fulton Co., August 4, 1846. Married
Anthony Stout, died Middletown, Ohio.
● Hannah, born December 27, 1810 in Green Co. Penn. Married David Ward Clark in Sangamon Co. Ill. July 7, 1831. D. W. Clark was born in Bourbon County, Ky. September 30, 1809 and died in Mt. Pulaski February -, 1892 and Hannah died there December 15, 1897.
● Thomas, born November 19, 1812, in Ohio. Married Elizabeth Williams
● Mary, born January 1, 1815. Married John McKinney and went to Wisconsin. She died January 14, 1894 at the home of her son, Thomas, Hoxie, Kansas.
● Matilda, married James Parish. They had a family and lived in Athens, Ill.

Anthony Stout died at Middletown and Sarah went to Miami Co. Ohio and was there married to Isaac Clark5, May 7, 1821. Isaac Clark5 was an uncle to D. W. Clark6, the husband of Hannah Stout.
Children second husband of Sarah (Royal) Stout. Isaac Clark5 and Sarah:
● Lydia Z, born February 16, 1822, m. George Snell
● William R., born July 15, 1823, m1 Elsey Fitsgerald; m2 Sarah Grigsby; m3 Huldah McCumber. William had children by each wife. He died August 9, 1906.
● Ezekiel, born May 4, 1825, m. Diantha Beckelhimer.
● Margaret, born November 1, 1826, m. John Grigsby
● Amy, born about 1828, m. Pleasant Bryant. Went to Kansas.
● James, born February 14, 1830, m. Catherine Gay

All of the children of Isaac and Sarah Clark, except James, had a family and many of their descendants now live in Fulton Co. Ill.
B for born
D ” died
M ” married
M1 ” ” 1st time [?]
7 William Royal, born February 24., 1796
m. Barbara Ebey September 8, 1818 in Doublin, Ohio
● Thomas Fletcher, m. Mary Ann Stanley
● Charles W., m.1 Rachel Misner; m.2 Sarah Cummings
● George A., born 1825, died October 16, 1842
● William Bramwell, m. Lizzie Hall
● James H., born m. Carrie Hall
● Mary Elizabeth, m. Rev. John Flynn in Oregon
● Jason Lee, m. Anna Browning in Oregon

William Royal (above) and his family crossed the plains from Illinois to Oregon in 1853. He was a minister in the M.E. Church and would not travel on Sunday. Those with whom he traveled would leave him Sunday morning, but he would overtake the others during the week and arrived in Oregon with the rest of the company.
He and his family visited my father’s home for two days just before he started west. He and my father corresponded for some years. I still have some of their letters, one of which, written by my father, was taken to Ohio and sent to me from there. William Royal died in Salem, Oregon September 29, 1870. Many of his descendants live in Oregon and other states. There were many preachers and teachers among them.
8 Charles, born March 19, 1798
m. Polly Gearhart in Piqua, Ohio.
● Thomas Wesley, born January 24, 1823 in Piqua, Ohio.
● Sara
● Eliza
● John
● James
● Charles Fletcher
● William
● Mary
● Lewis B.

9 Hannah, born February 26, 1801. M…Jarrett
A daughter, Mary married Aaron Hiner. Mary and Aaron went to McLean Co. Aaron died and Mary m …(?)
Thomas Royal was the grandfather of Hannah Stout Clark. See his 6th child. The above names appear on a bronze tablet at the south door of the court house at Springfield, Illinois.
Mrs. Hannah Cooper Royal died in Virginia and Thomas Royal married Miss Rebecca Matthews and moved to Franklin Co. Ohio.
10 Simon, born June 27, 1810, died in infancy.
11 Rebecca, born July 30, 1812, married Jacob Boyd
● John T., born 1835, married Sarah E. Clayton
● William, born May 1, 1837, married Mary A. Vigal
● George B., born December 25, 1839, married Hariet Williams
● Mary M., married Alonzo Sparks
● Susan, married Harvey Alexander
● James 0, married Marietta Reed
● Sarah J, married Elijah D. Lawley
● Davis 0, married Sarah A. Campbell
● Vincent C, died in his 18th year.

Mrs. Rebecca (Matthews) Royal died in Doublin, Franklin Co., Ohio and Thomas Royal married Mrs. Ellen Brunk; one child.
12 Joseph B., born November 1, 1816 in Franklin Co. Ohio. Joseph B. m1 Louisa Downing; m2 Mrs. Elsey McHendry. Joseph was a minister of the Christian Church and went to Vermont, Fulton Co. Ill.2 and had a family there. I have pictures of his two boys, Oscar and Eddie.
Dates for a sketch are sometimes given from memory, after many years, and there are likely to be some errors.

The “Early Settlers of Sangamon County” states that Thomas Royal came from Franklin County, Ohio to Illinois in a company of sixty-three persons, arriving in the fall of 1824 and also that Christopher Newcomer came from that county to Illinois, arriving December 9, 1824. They probably came together.

It also states that Absalom Meredith came from Miami Co. 0. to Illinois arriving October 27, 1829 and that the company in which they came numbered sixty-three persons.

While it might be possible, yet it is not very probable, that just sixty-three persons came together from different counties in Ohio to Illinois in different years.

Thomas Royal was the father-in-law of Absalom Meredith, and this information may have been given by different descendants, and one of them may have erred in regard to the number of persons they were telling about.

My father’s uncle, Rev. David Clark,5 came from Miami Co. Ohio to Ill. in 1829 and my mother came from there at the same time and lived with her relatives until she and my father were married.
Absalom Meredith and Rev. David Clark may have come to Ill. together.
Rev. David Clark5 was a brother of Isaac Clark5 who was the second husband of Sarah Royal Stout.
Thomas Royal died August, 1834; his widow died in September 1844., both in Sangamon Co. Ill. They were buried in the Geo. Brunk Cemetery several miles southeast of Springfield.

There is a stone at the grave which gives his birth date as 1758. That is not correct as the church records in England show he was baptized March 17, 1752. My mother told me he was a tall man.
In 1911 the D.A.R. unveiled, with appropriate exercises, a bronze tablet on which are inscribed the names of the twenty-four revolutionary soldiers who were buried in Sangamon Co., the name Thomas Royal being one of them. The tablet is near the south entrance of the County court house.
Hannah Cooper, the first wife of Thomas Royal, gave her son, William, an ancient family bible in which are some family records that are still legible.

It was handed down to his descendants until a few years ago when it was placed in the archives of the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, and I am informed by the Regent of the D.A.R. in that city that it is still there.

One of Hannah Cooper’s brothers was a silversmith. My mother had a teaspoon that he had made and on the handle of which was engraved the name “Cooper.” It was destroyed when my father’s home burned down January 15, 1888.

The descendants of Thomas Royal are a host now and could hardly be traced. I have the names of many of the later generations but probably all of them can trace their ancestral lineage back to some one of the names given above.

As before stated, I do not know whether or not any of Thomas Royal’s relatives ever came to America from England.
There is a family who spell their name as Royall, whose ancestors came from England many years before the revolution.

They are keeping in repair a mansion at Medford, Massachusetts which was built between 1637 and 1677 which at one time belonged to one of their ancestors.
If they were related to Thomas Royal it would be almost impossible to establish that fact.

The R. D. Clark Letter – Stout

The R. D. Clark Letter – Stout

This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Clark Letter

The parents of Hannah (Stout) Clark, the wife of David Ward Clark, were: Anthony Stout and Sarah (Royal) Stout. They settled in Green Co. Penn. where their daughter
1 – Hannah was born Thursday, December 27, 1810.
They moved to Ohio and the other three children were born there.
2 – Thomas married Elizabeth Williams
3 – Mary ” John McKinsy[?]
4 – Matilda ” James Parish
Anthony Stout died in Middletown, Ohio when the children were small. Sarah Stout married Isaac Clark5 July 7, 1821 in Miami Co. Ohio. Isaac Clark was a son of David and Sarah Clark4, and he was an uncle of David Ward Clark6, the husband of Hannah Stout.

I do not know the names of Anthony Stout’s father nor mother, nor of any of his brothers nor sisters, if there were any.

My mother told me he was a small man and that he was a Penn. dutchman. The family may have come from N.J. to Penn. as there were many there by the same name.

The following notes were prepared by me and given, in part, to the Historical Society at Springfield, Illinois.

My father left many notes in regard to the Royal family, which together with what was related to me by my mother, have been very helpful.

I have also corresponded with many of the descendants of Thomas Royal in several different states, which has enabled me to give fuller details than those which I learned from my parents.

A short sketch of him and some of his descendants may be found in a work entitled “A History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, 1836.”

Among the many correspondents was the Rev. Stanly [sic] O. Royal to whom I wrote many years ago, and sent him what I then had of the Royal family which he copied, and to which he added a great deal that I did not have at that time and returned it to me.

He was a District Superintendent of the M.E. Church in Ohio and a grandson of Rev. William Royal who crossed the plains from Illinois to Oregon in 1853.

He had intended to publish a book for the benefit of the descendants of Thomas Royal but he died April 13, 1914 before he had completed it, and his widow wrote me some years ago that he had not gone far enough with the book so that they could go on with it and she doubted if any of the family would ever do so.

The following may be of some interest to the descendants of Thomas Royal who was a soldier in the American Revolution.

There are doubtless many hundreds of them now living in the west and northwestern states and probably many of them live in the southern and eastern states as well.

The church records in England show that the parents of Thomas Royal were Thomas and Sarah Royal (then spelled Royle). They also show that Thomas was baptized March 27, 1752, and that at a very early date the name was spelled Ryle but gradually the spelling was changed to Royle.

Sometime after Thomas came to America, he spelled his name as Royal. Thomas and Sarah Royle, the parents of Thomas Royal, lived in England about half a mile from Cheadle and two miles from Stockport, Cheshire, and five miles from Manchester.

Thomas Royal had a sister, Elizabeth, born 1750. His other brothers and sisters were probably John, Ann, James, Charles, Mary, Sarah and Joseph but I have no record that any of them ever came to America but they may have done so later.

The Sangamon County Illinois History states that Thomas Royal came to America with a comrade about his own age near the beginning of the war for independence.

They both volunteered in the army of the Colonists and his comrade at his side had his head blown completely off.

About the same time Mr. Royal was severely wounded by a charge of buckshot entering his ankle, some of which he carried to his grave. So far as I know, that statement is correct, but I do not know who his superior officers were nor from what colony he enlisted.
After the war Mr. Royal married Miss Hannah Cooper in Philadelphia.

The following is a copy of his marriage certificate, the original some years ago being in the possession of Rev. T. R. Royal of Portland, Oregon and some of his descendants no doubt still have it.
“Philadelphia June 29, 1782
“These are to certify that on the 29th day of June in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty-two, Thomas Royle and Hannah Cooper are joined together in Holy Matrimony.
So witnesseth my hand,
John Kunse
Protestant Minister.”
[a rule appears here]

The above shows that Thomas Royal was first married in Philadelphia, but he settled in Virginia where the children by his first wife were born.

Thomas Royal’s son, Rev. William Royal, died in Salem, Oregon, September 29, 1870. I have his obituary which states that he was born in Monongahela County, West Virginia.

There is a Monongahela River and also a Monongahela city in that part of the country, but I find no record of any county by that name.

There is, however, a Monongalia County in West Virginia, which no doubt is the county in which William was born and where his father lived until he moved to Ohio.

My mother was born in Green County, Pennsylvania which adjoins Monongalia County in West Virginia, which was formerly a part of Virginia.

Her mother was Sarah (Royal) Stout, a daughter of Thomas Royal, and she might have settled near her parents, and may have gone to Ohio about the same time he did.

The Transportation of William Isgrig

The Transportation of William Isgrig

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Clark Letter

April 1740, trial of William Isgrigg t17400416-2; 192+ (Harvard University, “Old Bailey Proceedings Online.”

William Isgrigg, of St John Zachary, was indicted for stealing 9 Pair of Mens Silver Shoe-buckles, value 5 l. 4 Pair of Silver Knee-buckles, val. 20s. 3 Pair of Womens Silver Shoe-buckles, val. 24 s. 3 plain Gold Rings, val. 36 s. 2 enamell’d gold Rings, val. 12 s. a gold Ring set with 5 Stones, val. 3 s. a Silver Snuff-box with the inside gilded, val. 8 s. 7 Silver Stock-buckles, val. 21 s. and 3 Pair of Silver Stock-clasps, val. 18 s. the Goods of William Gould , in his Dwelling-house , Feb. 24.

William Gould . The Prisoner was my Apprentice, and had served me above half his Time. His Father lay very ill, and his Mother begg’d of me to let him go and see him, for he was (she said) at the Point of Death. I gave him Leave to go, and after he had been absent a Fortnight, I sent for him to come home: but he sent me Word, that the Physicians had given his Father over, and, as it was not expected he would live over that Night, he desired I would suffer him to stay one Night longer. I consented; and his Mother sent him Home next Morning, (as I was informed) but he did not come near me till Sunday the 24th of February last, (which was a Fortnight after he had been sent Home) and then my Servant-Maid informed me, she let the Prisoner into the House, a quarter after 8 in the Morning, before I was up. The next Morning (Monday) I got up between 7 and 8, and casting an Eye upon my Shew-Glass, I thought the Goods look’d thin, and that several Things were wanting. Upon this I examined my other Boy, and was satisfied that he knew nothing of them; and the Prisoner being absent again, I suspected him, and upon searching after him, I took him in Hanging-sword-Alley in Fleet-street, on the Wednesday Night following. He was carried to the Watch house, and there we found the gold Ring with 5 false Stones upon him, and nothing else. That Night he was sent to Bridewell, and the next Day we carried him before Sir Robert Godseball , where he confess’d he had pawn’d several Pair of my Buckles, Stock-buckles, and Stock-clasps, which are now in Court. This is the Stone-Ring which was found upon him at the Watch-house, and it is mine. I am pretty sure it was in the Shew-Glass, when we took it from the Window, into the Shop, on Saturday Night, and I miss’d it, with the rest of the Goods, on Monday the 25th of February, in the Morning.

John Hartwell , Constable. I took this Ring out of the Prisoner’s Pocket, at the Watch-house.

John Coombes. These Buckles were sealed up before Sir William Billers . They are the same which the Prosecutor swears were taken from him, and I found them at the Pawnbrokers. I have Warrants in my Pocket against two of them; their Names are William Wilson , James Crocket , James Jarvis , and Thomas Oldfield.

The Constable produced several Pair of Silver Buckles, which he had found at the Pawnbrokers.

Mr. Gould. These are my Goods; and I saw them on Saturday in my Shew-glass, which was taken into the Shop at Night. The Shop is part of my Dwelling-house, and I saw the Glass in the Shop on Sunday, but did not examine it till Monday Morning. The Prisoner is between 19 and 20 Years of Age. – I have another Apprentice, one John Priest , who has served about a Year of his Time; and my Servants have the Liberty of going into the Shop.

Prisoner. I have no Questions to ask, – I’ll give the Court no farther Trouble, – I acknowledge my Guilt, and hope you’ll consider me.

Gawen Nash. I went with Mr. Gould to search after the Prisoner, and the next Morning after we found him; I did, I believe, extort a Confession out of him, by promising him Compassion, if he would tell where the Things were.

Prisoner. My Master did promise me Mercy.

Mr. Nash. I told him it was his best Way to make Retaliation to his Master, by discovering where the Goods were: and he confessed more Goods than we have here in Court, and told us where they were to be found. He informed us, that Thomas Oldfield , who keeps a publick House in Tavistock-street, had many of the Goods; we went to him, and he was with us before the Justice, who bound him over to appear here with the Goods, and give Evidence, but he is not come.

The Court ordered him to be sent for; be accordingly appeared, and produced the Goods he had in his Possession, which were restored to Mr Gould, by Order of Court; after which he, with the other Pawnbrokers were very severely reprimanded for their Behaviour by the Court.

* The Sale of Goods, wrongfully taken, to any Broker or Pawn-taker in London, Westminster, Southwark, or within two Miles of London shall not alter the Property. – If a Broker, having received such Goods, shall not, upon Request of the Owner, discover them, how, and when, he came by them, and to whom they are conveyed, be shall forfeit the double Value thereof to the said Owner, to be recovered by Action of Debt. Stat. 1 Jac. I. c. 21. 1 6, 7.

The Jury found the Prisoner Guilty 4 s. 10 d. He was transported for seven years.

The R. D. Clark Letter – Clark and Isgrig

The R. D. Clark Letter – Clark and Isgrig

This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Clark Letter

Robert Clark wrote a long letter describing his genealogy in 1927.  He was 83 at the time.  It was difficult to read. The writing grew progressively worse and it was written with pen and ink which tends to be messy. Many spellings are known to be wrong. Others could be spelled incorrectly and I would not be aware of it. Keep in mind this was written in 1927. Modern research has made a significant number of corrections to the Clark and Isgrig information.  I am not familiar with his maternal line. 

The letter covers various lines and will be presented in several parts along with auxiliary information such as William Isgrig’s transportation record.

Information for a sketch of family records must necessarily be obtained by conversing with or corresponding with other persons, or from wills or other writings when they are made matters of record, and sometimes from county histories or from one’s own personal knowledge of dates and events and from many other sources.

The information received from one source will often conflict with that received from some other source, so that there may be some errors especially among the earlier generations. Even obituary notices are not always absolutely correct.

County histories are not always a very reliable source of information. A great deal of that which they contain is taken from statements of persons who gave the information from their best recollections and which is not always correct. I personally know of some errors in the Sangamon and Logan Co. Ill. histories, and also in the Miami 0. history and I have no reason to believe that these are exceptions.

Wills, when they are recorded, are more reliable as they usually give the names and dates of most, if not all, of the members of the family and often the names of some of the descendants and ancestors as well.

Family records which give only the names of the immediate family are also reliable.

Jonathan Winans, the father of Sarah (Winans) Scudder, in his family record, which is still extant, gives the birth dates of all the members of his family. These dates are no doubt correct. I have copies of a number of wills which were made by persons who lived in N.J. by the name of David Clark but I am not sure that any one of them is the will of the David Clark who married Mrs. Sarah (Winans) Scudder. Their son, David Clark2 made his will in Sangamon County, Illinois.
The father of David Clark1 may have been a soldier in the American Revolution but that is very doubtful for if he was living at that time, he was quite aged.

Jonathan Winans, the father of Sarah (Winans) Scudder, died in 1774 just before the American Revolution and none of his descendants in the Clark line, except those of David Clark2 have Winans ancestors who were Revolutionary soldiers although some of them have in other lines.

The second wife of David Clark2 was a daughter of Samuel Winans, who was a son of Jonathan Winans, and a brother of Sarah (Winans) Scudder, the wife of David Clark.1

Samuel Winans was a Revolutionary soldier. There were others by the name of Winans who were soldiers in the Revolution.

In an early day there were at least two separate families in N.J. by the name of Clark that were not related.

We are probably the descendants of Richard Clark who came from England to the New Haven colony and went from there to Long Island and then to Elizabeth, N.J. with his wife, Elizabeth, and a daughter, Elizabeth, and three sons about 1678. Two sons were born in N.J. (This has been disproven. David Clark who married Sarah Winans – not to be confused with their son David Clark who also married a Sarah Winans – is the first proven Clark in this line.)

Mr. J. C. Cox, of Miami Co. Ohio, who was a very enthusiastic searcher of family records once gave this as a guess which may or may not be correct.

Richard1, Samuel2, Jonathan3, David4 who married Mrs. Sarah (Winans) Scudder, whose first husband was Jacob Scudder by whom she had one son, Matthias.

After the death of Jacob Scudder, she married David Clark and they had a family of five sons and four daughters in N.J.

If Mr. Cox’s guess is correct, it would place this David Clark as of the 4th generation of his Clark line in America.

His wife, Sarah, was the 4th in the Winans line.

My father, David Ward Clark, in his family record has the following as showing who were the ancestors of his mother, Ann Isgrig, in America.

William Isgrig was born in England April 13, 1721. His third wife was Hannah Wolsey who was born April 13, 1716. (William Isgrig was transported to America in 1740. He married Hannah Clixbay and they had at least five children.)

Daniel Isgrig, born December 26, 1756, was their only child. Daniel married Margaret Cole, born June 14, 1751. Daniel and Margaret had a family of three boys and three girls.

Daniel and Margaret came to America and settled in Maryland, where their children were born. Their children were:
1 – William, who married Elizabeth Rutter
2 – Daniel ” ” Mary Currant
3 – Michael ” ” Margaret Currant
4 – Hannah ” ” William Pattison
5 – Margaret ” ” Peter Stephens
6 – Ann ” ” John W. Clark

GedStar Pro

GedStar Pro

Each morning on my phone I am treated to the time, date, weather and an “on this day” for my genealogy courtesy of a program called GedStar Pro for Android which includes GedStar Today. I see birthdays I may have forgotten and learn dates important in my family history.

I have used GedStar Pro for many years. It was first written for TMG, The Master Genealogist, which I used from the time it came out. After I switched to Legacy it became available for that program. It basically works off a GEDCOM file which is converted to a file that your Android device can read. Sorry Apple folks. Not for you.

Each morning I learn who was born, died and married on this date. No birthday, no matter how old, is forgotten. The patterns are sometimes interesting.

The main program also puts your genealogy on your device under GedStar Pro. This shows a person view, a family view, an ancestor view and a descendant view. Way back when, before smartphones and tablets, I had it on a Palm (remember those?). I pulled it out in the County Clerk’s Office to find whatever details they demanded to pull a file. Back then County Clerks were sometimes less than cooperative and flooding them with information was useful.

So, a birthday reminder along with your genealogy on your Android phone or tablet – great program, right? Did I mention that now it is FREE? You can find it here:

http://gedstarpro.com/index.php

Logan County Cemetery Map

Logan County Cemetery Map

When hunting for a cemetery a map is useful. This map was created by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources by Kathleen Brown. I haven’t found a bad location but I was amused to learn the state thinks the cemetery in Mt. Pulaski is unnamed. It’s Mt. Pulaski Cemetery.

Some cemeteries have other names. For example, Reece is generally called Shellhammer for the man who purchased the land after the Reece family moved to Kansas.

Logan Cemeteries map

 

You can see a larger version of this map here and a list of all the cemeteries with locations here.

Graduates

Graduates

Mt Pulaski Class of 1914

These handsome fellows are all the males in the first graduating class of Mt. Pulaski High School in 1914. They are Harry Rothwell, Frank Turley, Alfred Litterly and Floyd Downing. There were females in the class but they took a separate picture. I haven’t seen but have talked to people who said they did.