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The Transportation of William Isgrig

The Transportation of William Isgrig

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Clark Letter

April 1740, trial of William Isgrigg t17400416-2; 192+ (Harvard University, “Old Bailey Proceedings Online.”

William Isgrigg, of St John Zachary, was indicted for stealing 9 Pair of Mens Silver Shoe-buckles, value 5 l. 4 Pair of Silver Knee-buckles, val. 20s. 3 Pair of Womens Silver Shoe-buckles, val. 24 s. 3 plain Gold Rings, val. 36 s. 2 enamell’d gold Rings, val. 12 s. a gold Ring set with 5 Stones, val. 3 s. a Silver Snuff-box with the inside gilded, val. 8 s. 7 Silver Stock-buckles, val. 21 s. and 3 Pair of Silver Stock-clasps, val. 18 s. the Goods of William Gould , in his Dwelling-house , Feb. 24.

William Gould . The Prisoner was my Apprentice, and had served me above half his Time. His Father lay very ill, and his Mother begg’d of me to let him go and see him, for he was (she said) at the Point of Death. I gave him Leave to go, and after he had been absent a Fortnight, I sent for him to come home: but he sent me Word, that the Physicians had given his Father over, and, as it was not expected he would live over that Night, he desired I would suffer him to stay one Night longer. I consented; and his Mother sent him Home next Morning, (as I was informed) but he did not come near me till Sunday the 24th of February last, (which was a Fortnight after he had been sent Home) and then my Servant-Maid informed me, she let the Prisoner into the House, a quarter after 8 in the Morning, before I was up. The next Morning (Monday) I got up between 7 and 8, and casting an Eye upon my Shew-Glass, I thought the Goods look’d thin, and that several Things were wanting. Upon this I examined my other Boy, and was satisfied that he knew nothing of them; and the Prisoner being absent again, I suspected him, and upon searching after him, I took him in Hanging-sword-Alley in Fleet-street, on the Wednesday Night following. He was carried to the Watch house, and there we found the gold Ring with 5 false Stones upon him, and nothing else. That Night he was sent to Bridewell, and the next Day we carried him before Sir Robert Godseball , where he confess’d he had pawn’d several Pair of my Buckles, Stock-buckles, and Stock-clasps, which are now in Court. This is the Stone-Ring which was found upon him at the Watch-house, and it is mine. I am pretty sure it was in the Shew-Glass, when we took it from the Window, into the Shop, on Saturday Night, and I miss’d it, with the rest of the Goods, on Monday the 25th of February, in the Morning.

John Hartwell , Constable. I took this Ring out of the Prisoner’s Pocket, at the Watch-house.

John Coombes. These Buckles were sealed up before Sir William Billers . They are the same which the Prosecutor swears were taken from him, and I found them at the Pawnbrokers. I have Warrants in my Pocket against two of them; their Names are William Wilson , James Crocket , James Jarvis , and Thomas Oldfield.

The Constable produced several Pair of Silver Buckles, which he had found at the Pawnbrokers.

Mr. Gould. These are my Goods; and I saw them on Saturday in my Shew-glass, which was taken into the Shop at Night. The Shop is part of my Dwelling-house, and I saw the Glass in the Shop on Sunday, but did not examine it till Monday Morning. The Prisoner is between 19 and 20 Years of Age. – I have another Apprentice, one John Priest , who has served about a Year of his Time; and my Servants have the Liberty of going into the Shop.

Prisoner. I have no Questions to ask, – I’ll give the Court no farther Trouble, – I acknowledge my Guilt, and hope you’ll consider me.

Gawen Nash. I went with Mr. Gould to search after the Prisoner, and the next Morning after we found him; I did, I believe, extort a Confession out of him, by promising him Compassion, if he would tell where the Things were.

Prisoner. My Master did promise me Mercy.

Mr. Nash. I told him it was his best Way to make Retaliation to his Master, by discovering where the Goods were: and he confessed more Goods than we have here in Court, and told us where they were to be found. He informed us, that Thomas Oldfield , who keeps a publick House in Tavistock-street, had many of the Goods; we went to him, and he was with us before the Justice, who bound him over to appear here with the Goods, and give Evidence, but he is not come.

The Court ordered him to be sent for; be accordingly appeared, and produced the Goods he had in his Possession, which were restored to Mr Gould, by Order of Court; after which he, with the other Pawnbrokers were very severely reprimanded for their Behaviour by the Court.

* The Sale of Goods, wrongfully taken, to any Broker or Pawn-taker in London, Westminster, Southwark, or within two Miles of London shall not alter the Property. – If a Broker, having received such Goods, shall not, upon Request of the Owner, discover them, how, and when, he came by them, and to whom they are conveyed, be shall forfeit the double Value thereof to the said Owner, to be recovered by Action of Debt. Stat. 1 Jac. I. c. 21. 1 6, 7.

The Jury found the Prisoner Guilty 4 s. 10 d. He was transported for seven years.

The R. D. Clark Letter – Clark and Isgrig

The R. D. Clark Letter – Clark and Isgrig

This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Clark Letter

Robert Clark wrote a long letter describing his genealogy in 1927.  He was 83 at the time.  It was difficult to read. The writing grew progressively worse and it was written with pen and ink which tends to be messy. Many spellings are known to be wrong. Others could be spelled incorrectly and I would not be aware of it. Keep in mind this was written in 1927. Modern research has made a significant number of corrections to the Clark and Isgrig information.  I am not familiar with his maternal line. 

The letter covers various lines and will be presented in several parts along with auxiliary information such as William Isgrig’s transportation record.

Information for a sketch of family records must necessarily be obtained by conversing with or corresponding with other persons, or from wills or other writings when they are made matters of record, and sometimes from county histories or from one’s own personal knowledge of dates and events and from many other sources.

The information received from one source will often conflict with that received from some other source, so that there may be some errors especially among the earlier generations. Even obituary notices are not always absolutely correct.

County histories are not always a very reliable source of information. A great deal of that which they contain is taken from statements of persons who gave the information from their best recollections and which is not always correct. I personally know of some errors in the Sangamon and Logan Co. Ill. histories, and also in the Miami 0. history and I have no reason to believe that these are exceptions.

Wills, when they are recorded, are more reliable as they usually give the names and dates of most, if not all, of the members of the family and often the names of some of the descendants and ancestors as well.

Family records which give only the names of the immediate family are also reliable.

Jonathan Winans, the father of Sarah (Winans) Scudder, in his family record, which is still extant, gives the birth dates of all the members of his family. These dates are no doubt correct. I have copies of a number of wills which were made by persons who lived in N.J. by the name of David Clark but I am not sure that any one of them is the will of the David Clark who married Mrs. Sarah (Winans) Scudder. Their son, David Clark2 made his will in Sangamon County, Illinois.
The father of David Clark1 may have been a soldier in the American Revolution but that is very doubtful for if he was living at that time, he was quite aged.

Jonathan Winans, the father of Sarah (Winans) Scudder, died in 1774 just before the American Revolution and none of his descendants in the Clark line, except those of David Clark2 have Winans ancestors who were Revolutionary soldiers although some of them have in other lines.

The second wife of David Clark2 was a daughter of Samuel Winans, who was a son of Jonathan Winans, and a brother of Sarah (Winans) Scudder, the wife of David Clark.1

Samuel Winans was a Revolutionary soldier. There were others by the name of Winans who were soldiers in the Revolution.

In an early day there were at least two separate families in N.J. by the name of Clark that were not related.

We are probably the descendants of Richard Clark who came from England to the New Haven colony and went from there to Long Island and then to Elizabeth, N.J. with his wife, Elizabeth, and a daughter, Elizabeth, and three sons about 1678. Two sons were born in N.J. (This has been disproven. David Clark who married Sarah Winans – not to be confused with their son David Clark who also married a Sarah Winans – is the first proven Clark in this line.)

Mr. J. C. Cox, of Miami Co. Ohio, who was a very enthusiastic searcher of family records once gave this as a guess which may or may not be correct.

Richard1, Samuel2, Jonathan3, David4 who married Mrs. Sarah (Winans) Scudder, whose first husband was Jacob Scudder by whom she had one son, Matthias.

After the death of Jacob Scudder, she married David Clark and they had a family of five sons and four daughters in N.J.

If Mr. Cox’s guess is correct, it would place this David Clark as of the 4th generation of his Clark line in America.

His wife, Sarah, was the 4th in the Winans line.

My father, David Ward Clark, in his family record has the following as showing who were the ancestors of his mother, Ann Isgrig, in America.

William Isgrig was born in England April 13, 1721. His third wife was Hannah Wolsey who was born April 13, 1716. (William Isgrig was transported to America in 1740. He married Hannah Clixbay and they had at least five children.)

Daniel Isgrig, born December 26, 1756, was their only child. Daniel married Margaret Cole, born June 14, 1751. Daniel and Margaret had a family of three boys and three girls.

Daniel and Margaret came to America and settled in Maryland, where their children were born. Their children were:
1 – William, who married Elizabeth Rutter
2 – Daniel ” ” Mary Currant
3 – Michael ” ” Margaret Currant
4 – Hannah ” ” William Pattison
5 – Margaret ” ” Peter Stephens
6 – Ann ” ” John W. Clark

THREE BROTHERS

THREE BROTHERS

There were three brothers who went to Illinois. Most genealogists will tell you if it starts with “there were three brothers” or a descent from an Indian princess or royalty it is likely fantasy genealogy. Not so fast.

David Clark of Rahway, New Jersey, married Sarah Winans. They had nine known children, all born in New Jersey. The youngest three, all boys, were David, John Winans and Isaac – our three brothers who went to Illinois. They all went from Rahway to Miami County, Ohio, to Sangamon County, Illinois, although not together.

David Clark  went to Kentucky in 1798 and married Rachel Rutter there about 1800. She died in 1804. He went to Cincinnati in 1805, made brick for the first brick house there, then went back to New Jersey where in 1806 he married Sarah Winans. They became, like his parents, David Clark and Sarah Winans. In 1809 they moved to Miami County, Ohio. David’s oldest son Richard Winans Clark married John Winans’ second daughter Margaret Ann Clark in 1829 in Miami County, Ohio. The same year David, Sarah, the newlyweds and most of David and Sarah’s other children packed up and moved to Sangamon County, Illinois. David was a farmer and a Methodist preacher.

John Winans married Ann “Nancy” Isgrig in Bourbon County, Kentucky. They soon went to Miami County, Ohio. Family records indicate that their son Daniel was born in Ohio in 1812 but John Winans did service in the War of 1812 in the Kentucky Mounted Volunteer Militia, mustering in on August 31, 1813. After that he was undoubtedly in Ohio. He did not settle in Sangamon County, soon to be Logan County, Illinois, until 1838 when he was 60 years old. At that time his eldest daughter Hannah and her husband Asa French also moved to Logan County.

Isaac, the youngest, first married Lydia Zeliph. She died before 1821. He then married the widow Sarah Royal Stought, in Miami County, Ohio.  In 1829 they went Illinois, almost certainly stopping first in Sangamon County, where Sarah’s daughter Hannah by her first marriage married David Ward Clark, a child of Isaac’s brother John Winans, in Sangamon now Logan in 1831. Note that John Winans was not yet in Illinois but several of his children were. Issac settled in Fulton County where he owned a water powered grist mill.

Three brothers did come to Illinois. So far no Indian princesses or royalty. My emigrant Isgrig ancestor was transported to America by his majesty, a prisoner from Old Bailey – does that make a royalty connection?